New Promo Video for Thousands of Images, Now What?

Posted July 6th, 2013 by   |  Computers, Photography  |  Permalink

We’ve just posted a new promotion video for our book Thousands of Images, Now What? Here’s the link to watch the video and learn about the book.

Thousands of Images, Now What?

Thousands of images





Thousands of Images, Now What? Shipping

Posted March 21st, 2012 by   |  Photography, Software, Technology  |  Permalink

Our brand new book Thousands of Images, Now What? is shipping. We’ve just received our preliminary copies of the book and will be sending out autographed copies to all of you who pre-ordered. The book looks great and I’m very happy with the final product. You can order autographed copies at our website for Out There Images Books. Or, you can order from Amazon at this link: Thousands of Images at Amazon.com.

Order your copy today of Thousands of Images, Now What? Painlessly Organize, Save, and Back Up Your Digital Photos.

Order your copy today of Thousands of Images, Now What? Painlessly Organize, Save, and Back Up Your Digital Photos.





January 2012 Newsletter Posted

Posted January 9th, 2012 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

Our January 2012 newsletter is posted here: http://www.outthereimages.com/12_01_newsletter.html

January's GOAL Assignment is to fill the frame.

January's GOAL Assignment is to fill the frame.

Topics this month include an update on our new book (Thousands of Images), a review of Joe McNally’s new book (Sketching Light), tips on using Evernote and much more. Here’s the list:

– Thousands of Images, Now What?
– Stuff I Like This Month
– January GOAL Assignment: Fill the Frame
– Book Review: Sketching Light by Joe McNally
– Digital Tidbits: Evernote Service as a Photography Tool
– Photo Techniques: Dealing With Camera Condensation on Cold Days
– Workshop and Business Updates

Enjoy!





Phase One Is Stepping it Up

Posted August 25th, 2011 by   |  Photography, Software  |  Permalink

If you are like most photographers, you are heavily invested in Adobe software. Many shooters I work with use Adobe Photoshop CS5 or Elements while also using Lightroom 3 for their organizational needs. I use these products as well and have grown to firmly rely on them over the years. However, there are lots of other software manufacturers in the business and each have their niche. Many times another company’s products fit your needs a little better and that’s what I’ve found with Phase One’s software.

phaseoneheader

Phase One has been known for their high-end medium format digital backs for many years, but recently they have been putting quite a bit of effort into their software division. I am a regular user of their digital asset management software called Media Pro 1 and recommend it highly for professional photographers. I also recommend it for photographers who are serious about organizing their photo, video and audio libraries since the program does such a great job of helping you organize your digital life.

Media Pro 1

Media Pro 1

Another of their newer software products is an iPad application that allows you to control your dSLR camera in the studio. Capture Pilot wirelessly interfaces with your computer to control a tethered camera and also provides beautiful photo reviews on the iPad screen.

I’ve written a number of articles on these programs over at the Nikonians.org website. If you are interested in taking your workflow to the next level, give these articles a good read and evaluate for yourself if they make sense.

Media Pro 1 Article: http://www.nikonians.org/resources/reviews/media-pro-commentary

Capture Pilot Article: http://www.nikonians.org/resources/reviews/capture-pilot

Happy software shopping!





How to Display and Find Over 30,000 Images on the Internet. Guest Blog by Lloyd Smith

Posted April 4th, 2011 by   |  Photography, Travel, Uncategorized  |  Permalink

How to display and find over 30,000 images on the internet.
By Lloyd Smith

It all began in a Mexican Restaurant seven years ago…

Tristen in the alley. I kept shooting her as she played. I saw her motherand motioned I was going to take photos. She nodded back to me. Belize.

Tristen in the alley. I kept shooting her as she played. I saw her motherand motioned I was going to take photos. She nodded back to me. Belize.

In 2004, Missionary David Wagner from Builders International spoke at our church in Longview, WA (Columbia Heights Assembly of God). After the service, Pastor Kent asked my wife Helen and I to join them for lunch at a Mexican restaurant. We sat across the table from David who said that he had heard I was a photographer and he needed one for his upcoming Builders International Vision Casting trip to Venezuela.

Haiti – I sort of posed the boy. Directed him into the light.

Haiti – I sort of posed the boy. Directed him into the light.

I had never heard of Builders International or Vision Casting. He went on to explain their plan and I joined him for the first Vision Casting event in Venezuela in November of 2004. Since that chance meeting at the Mexican restaurant, I have been to 19 countries shooting photos for the Assemblies of God missions. That meeting one meeting changed the direction of my life and the focus of my photography forever. I had taught photography at the college level for 15 years, but this experience really expanded my experiences.

Walked by and window in Argentina and saw these girls. I motioned them over to the screen. It was hard not to have the camera focus on the screen but to drop inside.

Walked by and window in Argentina and saw these girls. I motioned them over to the screen. It was hard not to have the camera focus on the screen but to drop inside.

After photographing Builder International projects around the world for the past seven years (Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, South Africa, Belize, Argentina, Poland, Philippines, Belgium, Mexico, Cambodia, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Spain, Macedonia, Sri Lanka, China, Thailand, Venezuela and two Mexico cruises), I needed a platform to upload my photos to show the world. So I have placed over 30,000 photos from the trips in 92 albums on my Picasa web page.  These include images from the building projects, volunteers, country scenes, and local people.

She saw me and “toasted” me. She was standing on a street in Buenos Aires.

She saw me and “toasted” me. She was standing on a street in Buenos Aires.

That Picasa album was getting so unwieldy and difficult to find photos that I have placed them on a BLOG Website – http://buildersinternational.info.  The older albums begin at the bottom of the blog page in 2004 and end at the top in 2011. (Click older or newer posts to navigate the pages.)  It is interesting to note that the years of 2004 and 2005 were photographed with film, and from 2006 on are photographed with Nikon digital cameras.

I was in China and saw them playing with each other, they never saw me. In Tiananmen Square.

I was in China and saw them playing with each other, they never saw me. In Tiananmen Square.

Click on the link (http://buildersinternational.info) to see all the 92 albums then scroll down and click older posts to move down the BLOG. My son, Keith Smith, helped me set up the BLOG so I could attach keywords. If you look to the right side of the page you will see the titles to all the albums and words that describe what is in the albums. Click on the word, i.e. Vision Casting, and it should bring up every album from any vision casting trip or Argentina to see all Argentina albums.

I was walking by a shop in Chile and he never saw me. I shot in the D300 on monochrome. 3200 ISO.

I was walking by a shop in Chile and he never saw me. I shot in the D300 on monochrome. 3200 ISO.

Never saw me. She was standing on a street in Buenos Aires. I loved the movie poster. Actually, my wife spotted it. I took a dozen shots and only got one I liked.

Never saw me. She was standing on a street in Buenos Aires. I loved the movie poster. Actually, my wife spotted it. I took a dozen shots and only got one I liked.

People look at my photos and ask how I can walk up to people on the street from around the world and take their photo. Some never see me…sometimes I think I might get beat up, but I generally get the shot. I shoot two Nikons, the D200 with a 12-24 mm lens and a D300 with the VR 18-200 mm lens. The reason I use the two-camera system is so I do not have to switch lenses in the rain or dust but so I can shoot quickly.  I determined that if the world does not fit within my lens choices, I do not get the shot. I do sometimes use a micro lens for my close ups. I decided long ago that I cannot shot it all so I specialize in my 12-200mm area.

I was walking by a fence in Chile and this little girl peered out at me.

I was walking by a fence in Chile and this little girl peered out at me.

White balance 2800. Cabo.

White balance 2800. Cabo.

I do not own a copy of Photoshop. None of these have been Photoshopped as such. I shoot in the camera to make it work.

Lloyd Smith – Photographer

Lloyd Smith – Photographer





Online Data Storage?

Posted June 4th, 2009 by   |  Computers, Photography  |  Permalink

Just received a great question from Danny regarding online data storage.

Danny writes:

Mike…

Always appreciate and enjoy your newsletters. Do you use and/or recommend/discourage any of the online backup/restore services like Carbonite or Mosy? I gotta do “something” beyond my on-site hard drive mirroring using external drives. Want to cover my assets in case of fire or theft.

I’d appreciate your thoughts when you get a few moments.

Thanks,

Danny

My response:

Hi Danny –

I don’t use the online backup places for one significant reason: the amount of time it takes to upload/download data. Even over the fastest internet connections, transferring 1TB of data can take multiple hours and days. If my on-site disk drive fails it usually happens when I need the data the most. These things always happen when you are finishing a project for a client or trying to meet a deadline. Remember, Murphy’s Law is always in effect! Because of this, I don’t want to wait days (or even hours) to download my backup information.

I think the best solution is to create an off-site drive that is a clone of your on-site hard drive. Bring your off-site drive into the office once per week for data synchronization. Then, move it off-site immediately for safe keeping.

If disaster strikes my on-site drive, then I can quickly go grab the off-site backup and be back up and running in a matter of one hour.

Best regards,

Mike





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