Panoramas About Town

Posted January 22nd, 2016 by   |  Photography, Software  |  Permalink
Gig Harbor Pano

Panorama of the Gig Harbor waterfront. Nikon D750, 14-24mm f/2.8. Processed in Adobe Lightroom CC and stitched in Adobe Photoshop CC. Converted to black and white in Nik Silver Efex Pro.

I make a habit of carrying a camera with me just about everywhere I go, especially when heading out on short errands. I love finding new photographic gems in my hometown of Gig Harbor, Washington.

Last week, I headed down to the Post Office to ship some books and took a quick side trip to photograph the Gig Harbor waterfront with my Nikon D750 and 14-24mm f/2.8 lens. A couple days prior to that, I took a one-hour break from writing to walk across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge with my D750 and 24-70mm f/2.8 lens. In both cases, I decided to create panoramas of the scenes before me.

Narrows Bridge

Panorama from center span of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Nikon D750, 24-70mm. Processed in Adobe Lightroom CC. Stitched together in Adobe Photoshop CC.

I’ve been shooting more panoramas lately because I really enjoy the entire process from capture to print. I also love being able to capture the atmosphere of the scene in a way most people don’t normally see. On the technical side, I thoroughly enjoy the discipline it takes to create a good-looking pano. There are a lot of settings and techniques that have to be executed well in order to produce an image that works.

For example:

– Exposure control for the darkest and brightest areas of the scene

– Depth of field

– Composition

– White balance

– Panning technique

– Dealing with subjects that are moving

– Wind

– Sun

– Clouds

– Overlap percentage for individual frames

– Lens choice

– Distortion control

– Developing the images in software (Lightroom CC) so all images work together in the final panorama

– Stitching the images together in Lightroom CC or Photoshop CC

– Post-processing the panorama to fix problem areas

– Final presentation and printing

Some panoramas work really well and others are just, well, boring. Sometimes, you don’t know until you’ve gone through all the work and have the final image on your computer screen. In the case of the two images I’ve shown here, I like the image of the boats from downtown Gig Harbor, but don’t really care for the Narrows Bridge image. I think the reason why the Narrows Bridge shot falls flat for me is the clouds lack texture and form. I’ll need to go back on another day when the sky is more dramatic.

Because of my love of panoramas, I have decided to teach a panorama workshop on when I travel to The Woodlands, Texas in April. My partner in crime, Rick Hulbert (http://www.rickhulbertphotography.com), and I are running a series of four different workshops from April 4th – 9th, including one on panorama photography. These workshops are open for all camera users (Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Olympus, etc.) and all skill levels.

While in The Woodlands, we are joining The Woodlands Camera Club to celebrate their 10-year anniversary. After their party, we’ll run workshops and photo walks on a variety of topics like autofocus for action, urban and street photography, studio lighting, HDR photography, and more.

You should join us! More information here:

https://visadventures.com/workshops/the-woodlands-texas-april-5-9-2016/

TheWoodlands-workshop-flyer



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