Capture Camera Clip System

Posted July 5th, 2011 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink

Every once in a while a new product comes along that perfectly fills a niche. Everyone who sees the new product immediately slaps their forehead and says, “why didn’t I think of that?” The new Capture Camera Clip System by Peak Design is one of these products and I’m here to tell you that the clip is the perfect integration of inspiration, engineering, design and true functionality.

Capture Clip System designed by Pete Dering of Peak Design.

Capture Clip System designed by Pete Dering of Peak Design.

The Capture Camera Clip represents a new way to keep your camera accessible while participating in life’s adventures. The clip lets you mount a camera to your belt, backpack, brief case or just about anything else you can imagine. Peter Dering, the owner of Peak Design, came up with the idea while hiking and climbing in Northern California. He was frustrated by not having an easy way to securely mount his camera to his backpack and was tired of using a standard camera strap around his neck, since it would continuously bang against his chest during his hikes. He wanted a way for the camera to be easily accessible, yet very secure. So, he boldly quit his day job as an engineer and set about to design the perfect clip system to solve the problem.

Climbing Mt. Rainier in Washington State was the perfect test for the Capture Clip. I mounted my Nikon D7000 to the shoulder strap of my backpack and never took it off.

Climbing Mt. Rainier in Washington State was the perfect test for the Capture Clip. I mounted my Nikon D7000 to the shoulder strap of my backpack and never took it off.

After a number of prototypes and a big fundraising campaign on Kick Starter (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/97103764/capture-camera-clip-system), he debuted the Capture Camera Clip System. I saw a link on the internet and immediately purchased one for myself. The same day, I sent Peter an email asking if I could beta test his product. He responded with an enthusiastic yes and sent me  a prototype unit right away.

Here's a sunrise shot of Little Tahoma on Mt. Rainier that I took with my D7000. Since the camera was out of my backpack and mounted on the Capture Clip system, all I had to do was unlatch the camera, snap the shot and clip it back in. Simple. Fast. Elegant.

Here's a sunrise shot of Little Tahoma on Mt. Rainier that I took with my D7000. Since the camera was out of my backpack and mounted on the Capture Clip system, all I had to do was unlatch the camera, snap the shot and clip it back in. Simple. Fast. Elegant.

I’ve been testing the unit for about two months now and all I can say is … Awesome. The Capture Clip is seriously awesome. I’ve tested it all across the USA in places such as Disneyland, climbing Mt. Rainier, walking on the beach in Southern California, trail running with my son through the forest, biking, walking, exercising, traveling through Yellowstone National Park, and at events like weddings and birthdays. In every case, the clip performed flawlessly and perfectly.

A few weeks ago I went trail running with my son through the forests in Gig Harbor, WA. I mounted my SLR to a packpack as we jogged through about 3 miles of trails. My son (11 years old) took this shot of me with his Nikon D80.

A few weeks ago I went trail running with my son through the forests in Gig Harbor, WA. I mounted my SLR to a packpack as we jogged through about 3 miles of trails. My son (11 years old) took this shot of me with his Nikon D80.

Everywhere I go, people come up to me and ask, “What is that? Where can I get one?” I’ve decided that I should carry a handful of units with me as I travel, since I could probably sell every one to people who see me on the street.

A few days ago I was in Yellowstone National Park taking photographs in West Thumb and I spotted another guy using the Capture Clip System. I ran over to him and asked him how much he liked the clip and he said, “This is awesome. It is one of the best products I’ve ever used. Peter is going to sell a million of them!” Below is a photo of Rich Larson using his Capture Clip by Yellowstone Lake. Cool!

Rich Larson (and family) using the Capture Clip system at Yellowstone Lake last week. He said, "This clip is amazing. I love it. Pete Dering is going to sell a million of them!"

Rich Larson (and family) using the Capture Clip system at Yellowstone Lake last week. He said, "This clip is amazing. I love it. Pete Dering is going to sell a million of them!"

The clip design is very simple to use. The base unit of the system is a cleverly designed clamp that you secure to a belt, backpack or other strap. I like mounting the clip to my belt by my hip when I’m walking on the street. I simply place the clip on my right side, just in front of my hip so that while I’m walking, the camera moves comfortably with my body (below). When hiking or trail running, I put the clip on my backpack shoulder strap. This works much better for these higher output physical activities. It also allows full range of motion from my legs and arms for climbing, scrambling or skiing.

Here, I'm at Disneyland in California and used the Capture Clip all day long. I mounted it to my belt and had no problems as I jumped on and off all the amusement rides. The clip is super easy to use and very fast.

Here, I'm at Disneyland in California and used the Capture Clip all day long. I mounted it to my belt and had no problems as I jumped on and off all the amusement rides. The clip is super easy to use and very fast.

After the clip is mounted, the next step is to mount the quick release plate to the bottom of your camera. The cool thing is that the quick release plate uses the same geometry as Arca Swiss plates, so you can quickly transition your camera from the backpack strap (or belt) to your tripod ball head. This plate works with Really Right Stuff, Kirk and Markins ball heads. Again, all I can say is awesome. Peter really thought this one through and made the product so it works for us professionals.

I have used the clip with the following setups:
– Nikon D700
– Nikon D7000
– Canon G9 (point and shoot)
– Nikon P7000 (point and shoot)
– Nikon D300s and MB-D10

– 70-200mm f2.8
– 24-70mm f2.8
– 50mm f1.8
– 18-105mm kit lens
– Nikon 14-24mm f2.8

In each case, the clip performed as I grew to expected it to … perfectly.

The bottom of the plate has an extra female 1/4″ x 20 thread, so you can mount it onto other photo-specific equipment like light stands, clamps, car mounts, etc. In fact, Peter is designing a number of other products to go with the Capture Clip system that will allow you to mount cameras to things like bike handlebars, car roof racks and other unique vantage points.

The quick release is smooth and secure. In the two months I’ve been testing the clip, I’ve never once had a malfunction caused by the clip. Remember, this includes climbing, glissading, cycling and trail running. The camera isn’t going anywhere as long as you have clip/plate secured and in place. I did have an issue last week where I didn’t insert the plate into the clamp and my camera fell to the ground. However, this was user error. I’ve done this same thing before with my Arca Swiss tripod plates where I was in a hurry and didn’t double check to make sure the plate was properly inserted into my ball head clamp. As long as you snap the Capture Clip into place, you’ll never have an issue with the camera coming out or falling off.

Climbing Mt Rainier with the Capture Clip. When mounted to a shoulder strap, the clip keeps the camera perfectly in position for quick access. Also, all the weight of the camera is on the backpack, so back/neck strain is greatly reduced.

Climbing Mt Rainier with the Capture Clip. When mounted to a shoulder strap, the clip keeps the camera perfectly in position for quick access. Also, all the weight of the camera is on the backpack, so back/neck strain is greatly reduced. Photo by Dan Vaughn.

Once the camera plate is inserted into the clip, there is a secondary screw-lock (safety lock) designed for for people who are nervous about the setup. However, the truth is you don’t need it. I didn’t use it one time during my testing and never had reason to use the redundant lock.

The Capture Clip is a simple, elegant design. I know that I’m gushing accolades here, but the truth is that the system is excellent. I’m not selling these or getting any commission from Peter. In fact, I donated to his Kickstarter.com campaign just like everyone else did.

All I’m saying is that you have to buy one. You won’t regret it.

For more information on Peter’s products, head over to his website: www.peakdesignltd.com.



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