Viewing Tethered Shoot on iPad with Capture Pilot

Posted March 25th, 2011 by   |  Flash Photography, Photography, Software  |  Permalink

Just wrote a review for a great new product called Capture Pilot from the good people at Phase One. The product allows anyone with an iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch to view photos from a tethered photo shoot in real time. The product is truly awesome. Check out the article and see how I used it to photograph a bunch of young kids in an impromptu hotel studio.

Here’s the link to the review: http://www.nikonians.org/resources/reviews/capture-pilot

Click on the section “Pro Reviews” to read the article. If you only want to see the fun pictures, then click on the fourth page titled “Real World Testing.”

Photos from the Capture Pilot software review. Taken in a hotel room in Bend Oregon. Nikon D700, 24-70mm f2.8. Photoflex light stand, Photoflex 40" umbrella. Remote SB-700 flash.

Photos from the Capture Pilot software review. Taken in a hotel room in Bend Oregon. Nikon D700, 24-70mm f2.8. Photoflex light stand, Photoflex 40" umbrella. Remote SB-700 flash.





Bleach Bypass from Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0

Posted March 24th, 2011 by   |  Photography, Software  |  Permalink
Bench and metal wall. Bend, Oregon. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm zoom, handheld. Processed with Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0, Bleach Bypass.

Bench and metal wall. Bend, Oregon. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm zoom, handheld. Processed with Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0, Bleach Bypass.

I think all photographers should keep current on software and post-processing methods. In the “old days” of digital photography we had to create everything in Photoshop. We learned all kids of tricks and methods to produce frames, grunge looks, cross processing, etc. Now, all we need to do is spend a few bucks on a software plug-in and viola! New photo!

My favorite plug-ins by far are Nik Software’s suite of products. One of the products that I deem indespensible is Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0. I could write an entire novel of tutorials on how to use all the different settings, but in the interest of time (and my sanity), I’ll just show the results from a simple setting called Bleach Bypass.

Photo directly from camera and processed through Adobe Camera Raw.

Photo directly from camera and processed through Adobe Camera Raw.

The photo directly above shows what the image looked like directly out of my Nikon D7000 camera. I opened it in ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) and brought it into Photoshop CS5. The photo is “ok” but really needs some additional punch. So, I activated Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 from the Filter menu in CS5 (shown below).

Accessing Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 from Photoshop is as simple as choosing Filter --> Nik Software --> Color Efex Pro 3.0

Accessing Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 from Photoshop is as simple as choosing Filter --> Nik Software --> Color Efex Pro 3.0

The next step (below) is to choose Bleach Bypass from the left hand column of choices. Then, play with the sliders until you are happy with the result. In this case, the metal background was blowing out a bit, so I moved the highlight protection slider up to bring back some detail.

This is the Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 interface screen.

This is the Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 interface screen.

After you are finished modifying the image, click the OK button to return to Photoshop. At that point, you can save the photo as a new image and prepare it for output.

Since I was already having fun with Bleach Bypass, I decided to try it on another photo of a bike rack (below). This time a bit more intense with the contrast and overall effect.

Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 Bleach Bypass and bike rack.

Nik Color Efex Pro 3.0 Bleach Bypass and bike rack.





Old Mill District – Bend, OR

Posted March 22nd, 2011 by   |  Photography, Software, Travel  |  Permalink

Took a trip down to Bend Oregon a few days ago for a family wedding. While there, our extended family went out to dinner at an Italian restaurant in the Old Mill District. The Old Mill District is a great place to take photographs and I enjoyed capturing the buildings during the evening/dusk hours. All these images were taken with the Nikon D7000 and 18-105mm kit lens – a great little setup for travel. I’m loving the image quality from the 16.2 MP D7000.

Blue Hour over Orvis. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, camera braced against railing.

Blue Hour over Orvis. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, camera braced against railing.

Blue Hour over Regal Cinemas. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld.

Blue Hour over Regal Cinemas. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld.

Pond and stores near sunset. Three image HDR processed with Nik HDR Efex Pro. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld.

Pond and stores near sunset. Three image HDR processed with Nik HDR Efex Pro. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld.





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