Photographing Local History – Skansie Netshed

Posted March 25th, 2015 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink
Skansie Netshed

Skansie Netshed in Gig Harbor, WA.

Creating artistic photos of my home town of Gig Harbor, Washington is one of my favorite things to do. I love capturing the rich heritage of my town and finding different ways to represent its local icons.

One of the more important families in the history of Gig Harbor was the Skansie family. They were boat builders in the early 1900’s and produced over 100 commercial fishing vessels and ferries. Their original netshed still stands along the waterfront. A few years ago, the Gig Harbor Historical Society was able to secure funding to refurbish the Skansie Netshed and open it to the public. Their work helped beautify and preserve this classic building.

For this image, I waited for a day with puffy clouds in the sky, then took my Nikon D800 down to the waterfront with a single lens, the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8. I kept my kit light and decided to leave my tripod at home. I shot a few compositions of the building, then decided the best look for the given light was a tight crop with no other distracting elements such as buildings or boats. The D800 has an incredible dynamic range, so I exposed a single image to hold detail in the clouds. In Lightroom, I pulled out a bit of shadow detail then sent the file to Nik Silver Efex Pro to convert it to black and white. After the conversion, I brought it back to Lightroom to do the final crop.

Here’s some more information from the Harbor History Museum’s blog:

http://harborhistorymuseum.blogspot.com/2013/08/skansie-netshed.html

For more information on the remaining 17 netsheds in Gig Harbor, follow this link:

17 Netsheds Remaining in Gig Harbor

 





Large Prints From the Nikon D800

Posted March 28th, 2012 by   |  Photography, Software  |  Permalink

I’ve been using the Nikon D800 for less than a week now and wanted to create some large prints from the camera to assess its overall quality. I sent off four different files to a large-format Epson inkjet printer and was very impressed with the resulting images. They are truly beautiful and are giving my best efforts from my other cameras a run for the money. The more I work with this camera, the more I feel it is truly a game-changer.

Here’s a short video I produced today showing off the prints and comparing some black & whites, color, and panoramas from the D800 and the D7000.

Nikon-D800-Prints from Mike Hagen on Vimeo.





Always Take Your Camera

Posted July 29th, 2011 by   |  Photography, Software  |  Permalink

I know you’ve all heard this a million times before, but if you are a photographer, then you should always have a camera with you. I don’t care what type of camera you take, but it should be something that allows you to snap an image. Cell phone. Point and Shoot. dSLR. Rangefinder. EVIL. ILC. Anything.

Tacoma Narrows Bridge from Narrows Park in Gig Harbor, WA. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm. Hand held five frame panorama. Stitched together with Photoshop CS5. Processed through Nik HDR Efex Pro to bring out detail in the clouds. Converted to Black and White in Nik Silver Efex Pro 2.

Tacoma Narrows Bridge from Narrows Park in Gig Harbor, WA. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm. Hand held five frame panorama. Stitched together with Photoshop CS5. Processed through Nik HDR Efex Pro to bring out detail in the clouds. Converted to Black and White in Nik Silver Efex Pro 2.

Over the last two weeks, I’ve had lots of family staying with me at my home in Gig Harbor, WA. Each day, we’ve gone on hikes and adventures exploring this beautiful corner of the world. Over the last two days my nieces, nephews and I have been exploring the local Puget Sound beaches. The kids and I have been having a blast skipping rocks, climbing cliffs and looking for jelly fish. The entire time I’ve slung my little Nikon D7000 and 18-105mm kit lens over my shoulder everywhere I go. It’s been wonderful to capture these great images that I normally would have passed by.

Mt. Rainier and Tacoma Tide Flats. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld. Photo taken from Sunrise Park. Processed in Nikon Capture NX2 using Pro Contrast. Border was created in NX2 using a rectangular marquee and a levels adjustment.

Mt. Rainier and Tacoma Tide Flats. Nikon D7000, 18-105mm, handheld. Photo taken from Sunrise Park. Processed in Nikon Capture NX2 using Pro Contrast. Border was created in NX2 using a rectangular marquee and a levels adjustment.

“You can’t get the pics if you don’t have the camera.”
-Mike Hagen





© 2020 Visual Adventures | Site Policies | Web by Works Development