Why the Dark Skies?

Posted October 6th, 2009 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink
Notice how the sky changes in brightness from the left side to the right side. Read on for an explanation of why this happens. Nikon D700, 12-24mm, from moving Alaska Railroad train.

Notice how the sky changes in brightness from the left side to the right side. Read on for an explanation of why this happens. Nikon D700, 12-24mm, from moving Alaska Railroad train.

I received a great email question yesterday from a newsletter reader, Jack. He says, “Mike, in my landscape shots, sometimes one side of the sky is darker than the other side.  This can happen whether I’m using a polarizer or not.  Do you know what causes that?”

Here’s my answer:

This is a common issue with wide angle lenses when you are photographing blue skies. These lenses take in so much of the sky, that one side is bright and the other is dark based on that areas’s proximity to the sun. You’ll notice that the area next to the sun is brighter while the area of sky opposite the sun is much darker. This is a natural atmospheric phenomenon and is more pronounced at sunrise/sunset than during mid-day. If you use a polarizer, the effect can be much more pronounced.

I see this effect all the time in my photography. For example, look at this photograph above, taken just outside of Anchorage Alaska. Our Nikonians photo group was riding the Alaska Railroad on our way to Denali National Park a few weeks ago when we saw this beautiful lake with mountains behind it. I wanted to capture the expansiveness, so I used my 12-24mm and composed photograph so that I could include the foreground, lake, mountains, blue sky and white puffy clouds. The variation in sky brightness from the left to the right is definitely visible. The sun was rising on the right, so that side of the sky is brighter.

The next time you are taking photographs outside on a sunny day, do this test:
1. Set your camera for spot meter
2. Point it at the sky in the right side of the frame and note the exposure value.
3. Then, point the spot meter at the sky in the left side of the frame and note the exposure value.

You’ll generally see a one, two or three stop difference depending on time of day.

One more thought on this. You’ll also see this brightness shift vertically, from the horizon to the azimuth. In fact, Singh-Ray has made a filter to combat this vertical brightness difference called a reverse neutral density filter. http://www.singh-ray.com/reversegrads.html





More beauty in Denali NP

Posted September 10th, 2009 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink
Mountain range at sunrise.

Mountain range at sunrise.

Dall sheep ram.

Dall sheep ram.

Caribou in front of mountain range in the Toklat River.

Caribou in front of mountain range in the Toklat River.

Reflection on pond next to Teklanika River.

Reflection on pond next to Teklanika River.

The mountain wasn’t out today and was obscured by clouds. So, what do you do when the mountain isn’t out? Take pictures of “non mountains”. Today we were blessed with bighorn sheep, caribou, and stunning river valleys.

Denali is truly a national treasure and everyone should make a point to make the trek at least once in their life.





Day 2 in Denali NP

Posted September 8th, 2009 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink
Mt. McKinley from Eielson.

Mt. McKinley from Eielson.

Fox in Denali NP.

Fox in Denali NP.

Northern Hawk Owl.

Northern Hawk Owl.

Had a fun day yesterday in Denali NP. We were able to photograph the mountain and see how massive it is. The weather up here has been amazing and our group was walking around in t-shirts all day long.

We are headed back into the park today for more fall color, wildlife and nature photography.





Beautiful Day in Anchorage Alaska

Posted September 5th, 2009 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink
Alaska mountains and glaciers south of Anchorage, Alaska

Alaska mountains and glaciers south of Anchorage.

Anchorage, air crossroads of the world.

Anchorage, air crossroads of the world.

The weather was absolutely stunning this morning coming into Anchorage, Alaska. Beautiful blue sky. Crystal clear air. Wow.

Hopefully, the weather holds out for a few days as we make our trek up to Denali NP.





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