Juxtaposing Old and New

Posted February 16th, 2017 by   |  Photography, Travel, Workshops  |  Permalink
Model T

Showing the old with the new can be an important aspect to your story telling. Don’t skip juxtaposing classic elements with modern elements in your photography. Nikon D800, 24-70mm f/2.8

Lots of times in photography we want to compose the scene we’re photographing so that it appears as if it is from a specific era. Professional photographers often want our images to appear timeless. This approach gives our images more staying power and therefore allows them to be used in any decade. As I travel the world, I make sure to compose a good percentage of my images so they don’t include elements from vastly different eras in the same scene. This is often easier to do in nature photography, but it can be very difficult in urban environments.

During a recent trip to Cuba, I was constantly struggling with this approach. Much of Cuba is stuck in 1959 but their nation is also struggling to fit into the modern world. For example, many of the cars are pre-1960 American vehicles, while the many of the buildings are from the 1700s and 1800s. Couple that with the modern imported cars from Asia and all the people with cellphones walking the streets and you have an amazingly diverse visual setting.

Cuban street

I love this photograph showing a classic car on a quintessential Cuban street … BUT! … look at that modern white car on the other side. What to do? My options were to not take the photo, or take it and embrace the modern element. Nikon D750, Rokinon 14mm f/2.8

Trying to isolate a visual element while eliminating elements from different eras takes quite a bit of effort and patience! At some point during my trip, I decided that I would embrace the juxtaposition between old and new and use that as a thematic element in my story telling. Rather than fight it, I decided to embrace it! I set about tell Cuba’s story in a way that would show how the modern era is quickly emerging.

That’s a lesson I have to learn over and over again in photography. I go into a scenario with a certain mindset and find that reality is different than I expected. Rather than trying to impose my will on my surroundings, I find I get better images when I adapt to the scene. Next time you go out photographing on a trip, I encourage you to adapt to your scene as well. Your photographs will thank you.

 

Buick

Even “classic” cars in Cuba have lots of modern elements like the LED headlights and aftermarket radiator fans. Nikon D750, 24-70mm f/2.8.

 

Pink chevy

Even a classic scene like this is filled with modern elements. The girl with the cell phone. The guy’s tennis shoes. The modern car in the background. Nikon D800, 24-70mm f/2.8.



2 Comments on “Juxtaposing Old and New”

  • FTPHOTOSNZ February 17th, 2017 2:24 pm

    You couldnt have explained this more clearly In my case these situations happen on a regular basis now Ive started looking at classic and vintage vehicles, & Urbex. Often I may spend time waiting till the conflicting elements that dont fit (like the girl with the cellphone depart the scene or the guy with the tennis shoes changes position) I appreciate that is allways not possible so may take a series of 5-6 pics and then chose Also unlike some (maybe its an age thing 70 this week) was bought up on film 35mm 6×7) have recently swithed to DLSR but dont let it go to my head and may end up with 4-5 pics of a scene not like some Ive seen take 20-30 of the same scene with very litle difference between them Hope this makes sense
    Frank

  • Mike Hagen February 27th, 2017 2:42 pm

    Frank – It is all about patience and timing. I seem to have less patience as time goes on! We’re in this together.

Leave a Reply

© 2017 Visual Adventures | Site Policies | Web by Works Development