Implied Emotion in Wildlife Photography

Posted December 13th, 2016 by   |  Photography, Travel, Wildlife  |  Permalink

The next time you are out photographing wildlife, I encourage you to look for behaviors and poses that imply human emotion. We are naturally drawn to imagery that mirrors our own emotions. Sadness. Happiness. Shyness. Joy. Anger. If your photograph implies any of these, then viewers will respond very positively to your pictures.

Shy giraffe

Shy giraffe under an acacia tree. Tarangire National Park, Tanzania. Nikon D800, 200-400mm f/4.

In the example above, we arrived on scene to find a giraffe resting in the shade of an acacia tree. My first instinct was to position our vehicle to photograph the giraffe from the front so we could have a better view of its body. After thinking about the image for a minute, I realized that the giraffe was rubbing its head against the tree. This behavior made it appear as if it was shy or timid. Rather than snapping a standard full-length grab-shot of the giraffe, I worked a bit harder to find a way to show emotion.

Maybe the image of the giraffe’s head poking out from behind a tree implies a game of peek-a-boo with a young child. Or, perhaps it implies an adult looking around the corner to see who might be there before coming out into the open. Either way, it is a much stronger image.

 

 



One Comment on “Implied Emotion in Wildlife Photography”

  • Kathleen Nash January 24th, 2017 6:22 am

    Hello. You have beautiful photos. Thanks for the tip.

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