Galapagos Iguana Week – Thursday

Posted February 13th, 2014 by   |  Photography, Travel  |  Permalink

It’s Iguana Week here at Visual Adventures where we celebrate the odd, yet somehow beautiful Galapagos iguanas. Check back each day for cool facts about these creatures along with photographs of the iguana in their native environment.

The marine iguana's claws help it grasp rocks while sunning or while eating seaweed on the ocean floor. Nikon D800, Nikon 200-400mm f/4.

The marine iguana’s claws help it grasp rocks while sunning or while eating seaweed on the ocean floor. Nikon D800, Nikon 200-400mm f/4.

Marine iguanas have laterally flattened tails that help propel them through the water similarly to a crocodile or alligator. Their claws are long and sharp for clinging to rocks while above ground and are also used for hanging onto underwater rocks while eating algae in heavy currents. The largest marine iguanas can dive up to 100 feet deep and hold their breath for up to 45 minutes in their search of seaweed.

The marine iguanas have special glands that purify their blood of surplus sea salt, which they ingest while eating seaweed. You’ll often see and hear iguanas expelling the salt while they are sunning themselves on the rocky shores and sandy beaches next to the ocean. It looks and sounds exactly like a human sneeze.

Iguana on shoreline

Iguana walking along the shoreline. Nikon D7000, Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8.

Our next photo adventure to the Galapagos is set for September 5-14, 2014 and this time we’re running it in conjunction with renowned photographer Tim Vollmer of Iceland. We’ve chartered our own private expedition yacht specifically for our own use during the adventure. More info and sign up here: Galapagos Islands Photo Adventure

Iguana colony.

Here’s a group (slaughter) of iguanas sunning themselves on the shore next to our expedition yacht. Nikon D800, Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8.



Leave a Reply

© 2017 Visual Adventures | Site Policies | Web by Works Development