Light L16 Camera Combines 16 Cameras for 52MP

Posted October 8th, 2015 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

L16-FRONT

New camera company light announced today their L16 point and shoot camera. Their claim is that users will experience DSLR quality in a camera the size of a mobile phone. They plan to accomplish this with an array of 16 different cameras built into the main body. At any given time, 10 of the 16 cameras will be taking the photos, then their algorithm pieces together a final image to form an image file up to 52 megapixels.

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Here are some of the interesting specs from the camera:

– 35-150mm equivalent optical zoom

– 52 megapixels

– Ability to shoot RAW (DNG), JPG, or TIFF

– Operates on Android, so you’ll be able to use any Android app.

– Ability to adjust focus and depth of field after taking the shot

– Wi-fi download of images

– 4K video

– Excellent low-light performance

– Wide dynamic range

This is sure to be a game changer.

If you want to order your own, please use this special “friends and family code” from my friend Michael Rubin who works at Light.co.

Friends and family link: Light L16 pre-orders

Friends and family discount code: FFMR96.

L16-LENS-CLOSEUP-2

 

Light image exporter

Light image exporter

Light image exporter

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L16-BAG-CLOSEUP

Light image exporter

 

 

 





Snapseed 2.0 Released

Posted April 9th, 2015 by   |  Photography, Software, Technology  |  Permalink

Snapseed 2.0

A brand new version of Snapseed for mobile image editing is live, now called Snapseed 2.0. I’m on the beta team and have been testing this new version for a few months. Version 2.0 is a significant update and best of all, it is free!

This program is a winner because of all the local and selective adjustments you are able to incorporate into image development. Also, you are able to work in stacks that allow you to go back and re-edit changes you’ve previously made. This is a solid mobile image-editing app and should be on everyone’s phone or tablet.

IPenguins

Here are a few Snapseed 2.0 links:
iOS: Snapseed 2.0 iOS Info and Download
Android: Snapseed 2.0 Android Info and Download
Product forum: User to user Snapseed forum
G+ page: Snapseed 2.0 Google+ Page

 

Here’s a cool video from Google showing how easy and quick it is to use Snapseed:





Nikon Announces the D810

Posted June 26th, 2014 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

Nikon D810

Nikon just announced the new D810 today and will be shipping the 36.3 MP camera as early as July 17th. Order at B&H here using this link: D810 at B&H Photo Video. Price is slated to be $3,299.95 for the body only. This new camera has quite a few significant improvements over the Nikon D800/D800E models and I consider it to be a solid update to an already impressive camera. Nikon has done a good job on the D810 and I highly recommend this camera system.

Most photographers will really appreciate the new ISO range from ISO 32 to ISO 51,200. Iso 6432will allow shooting long exposures of ocean scenes and waterfalls while ISO 51,200 allows low light photography and videography. Another significant update is the new image processor called EXPEED 4. the EXPEED 4 is over 30% faster than the EXPEED 3 so practically speaking that means you’ll be able to photograph more frames in a row before the buffer fills up. Speaking of frame rate, the D810 increases its maximum frame rate to 5 frames per second compared to the D800’s 4 fps.

Nikon eliminated the anti-aliasing / optical low pass filter over the sensor, so overall clarity and sharpness should be stunning. And other big improvement is the addition of electronic front curtain shutter, which will eliminate shutter-induced vibration when using the live view mode. This is a big boon for macro photographers and long lens shooters.

The D810 introduces a new RAW file format called S RAW which is a compressed 12-bit file designed to take up less space on your memory cards and hard drives. Another of the big updates from Nikon is the autofocus system has been upgraded to be the same as the new D4S. Included in this new upgrade is the brand-new group area autofocus that uses a cluster of four focusing sensors.

For video shooters, the Nikon D800 has truly become a multimedia machine. It now boasts automatic ISO adjustments Wyland manual mode, 60 frames per second shooting at 1080P, ability to video at ISO 12,800, and a longer battery life that will allow up to 40 minutes of recording time. Also, the D810 Will have the ability to display zebra stripes which will show video shooters where potential highlights are located in the frame.

 

Top of Nikon D810

back of Nikon D810

 

 

Nikon has put together a great PDF comparing the differences between the D800 and D810 here: Nikon D800/D800E vs. D810 Comparison Sheet.

D810 comparison

Check out the sample photos from the new camera on Nikon’s Flickr feed. They have included all EXIF data so you’ll be able to see what settings were used, including those with low and high ISOs. Nikon D810 Sample Images on Flickr. Here are examples of some of the images from Nikon:

© Lucas Gilman

© Lucas Gilman

© Junji Takasago

© Junji Takasago

© Miss Aniela

© Miss Aniela

© Miss Aniela

© Miss Aniela

 

Nikon D810 Introduction Video by Nikon Product Manager Lindsay Silverman

Dream Park – Nikon D810 Promo Video

Nikon D810 – Behind the scenes of an adventure shoot with Lucas Gilman

Nikon D810 – Behind the scenes of a fantasy fashion shoot with Miss Aniela

Nikon is also putting together a D810 DSLR Filmmaker’s Kit that includes a variety of lenses, video recorder, filters and microphone. You can order the kit at B&H here: Nikon D810 Filmmaker’s Kit.

Here’s what’s included in the kit:

– AF-S NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G ED Lens
– AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Lens
– AF-S NIKKOR 85mm f/1.8G Lens
– Atomos Ninja 2 Video Recorder
– ME-1 Stereo Microphone
– Tiffen 58mm Variable ND Filter
– Tiffen 67mm Variable ND Filter
– HC-E1 18″ HDMI Cable
– Two EN-EL15 Li-Ion Batteries

D810 filmmakers kit

 

 

 





30 Year Timelapse Shows Earth’s Changing Surface

Posted May 10th, 2013 by   |  Photography, Technology, Travel, Uncategorized  |  Permalink

This is very cool. Time has published the results of 30 years of LandSat imagery showing the changing surface of the earth. The neat thing is you can type in your own home town and watch the surrounding area change over 30 years. I encourage you to check out places like Phoenix, AZ and Las Vegas, NV to see what big urban growth looks like in a compressed video.

http://world.time.com/timelapse/

LandSat satellite time-lapse





Android Cameras and the Nikon S800c

Posted August 22nd, 2012 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

Merging different technologies can be a dicey proposition for manufacturers since they never really know if the final product will be a runaway success or a total flop.

For example, here are some recent merges that you may or may not have heard of:
– Microsoft and Ford Sync
– LifeSavers flavored soft drinks
– Apple Siri
– Smith and Wesson mountain bikes

Two of the products on the list seem to be a success while the other two … not so much. In the camera market, the pressure from mobile phones has been intense. Today, mobile phones have decent built-in cameras that allow users to edit, modify, post, upload, email and control the output of their images. The big camera manufacturers have taken notice and realize that technologies are merging at a fast rate and if they want to keep their market share, they’ll need to start producing products that integrate the best of mobile technology with the best of camera technology.

Nikon S800c

Nikon S800c compact camera with Android, Wi-Fi, and GPS.

Today, Nikon took the industry’s first step by introducing the Nikon S800c compact camera. This new camera integrates the Android operating system with Wi-Fi and GPS to create a true social media machine. The camera allows you to upload videos to YouTube in real time. Users will be able to load all their favorite Android apps on the camera including fan-favorites Instagram and Hipstamatic. You’ll also be able to load games such as Angry Birds to whittle away your time on those long flights home. Other capabilities include web browsing and sending/receiving email. The only think the camera is missing is a telephone.

Nikon S800c Back

Nikon S800c Android powered compact camera with Wi-Fi and GPS.

Time will tell if this idea turns into a winner for Nikon. My feeling is that this concept will take some time to mature, but I am excited that the technologies have finally merged. For quite some time, I’ve wanted the ability to “go mobile” in my larger SLR cameras. When I travel, I’d love to be able to snap a pic in my Nikon D800, then upload it directly to Google+, Facebook, Instagram, etc. I’m hoping the big camera manufactures add mobile technology operating systems to our SLR and mirrorless cameras.

 





April 2012 Newsletter Posted

Posted April 14th, 2012 by   |  Front Page, Photography, Software, Technology  |  Permalink

Topics this month include:

– Nikon D800 and D4 Setup Guides
– New Workshops Posted and New Books Are Selling Well
– Stuff I Like This Month
– March GOAL Assignment: Walking Zoom
– April GOAL Assignment: Window Light Portraits and Book Giveaway
– Product Review: Joby Gorilla Pod
– Digital Tidbits: How to Fix a Red Face in Nikon Capture NX
– Workshop and Business Updates

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Nikon D800 Initial Impressions from the Studio and Outdoors

Posted March 23rd, 2012 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

The Nikon D800 has arrived and it is a beauty! I’ve been shooting with the camera today and thought I’d put together a quick video and some sample images showing some of today’s first pictures from the studio and the outdoors. Here’s a direct link to the video if it isn’t showing up in your browser: Mike Hagen’s Nikon D800 Initial Impressions

Nikon D800 Initial Impressions from Mike Hagen on Vimeo.

The 36MP sensor is truly incredible and the files are massive. Working with these D800 photos will require little bit of patience as well as some more RAM!

My initial impression of the images from the D800 is that they are rich and full of life. They are filled with more detail than I’ve ever seen from a Nikon camera and I am thoroughly impressed with everything I’ve seen. Below are some sample images with a few links to full-size jpgs for you to download and work with yourself. I processed each of the images for this blog post in Nikon Capture NX2 on a MacBook Pro with 16GB of RAM.

The first set of images below were taken with the Nikon D800 at ISO 200. Check out the 100% crop to assess the quality for yourself. At ISO 200, the Nikon D800 produces beautiful detail and amazing colors. As you would expect, the camera is flawless at this ISO setting. Click here for a full-resolution jpg.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, ISO 200.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, ISO 200.

100% crop of image at ISO 200 and f/16.

100% crop of image at ISO 200 and f/16.

Next, I increased the Nikon D800 ISO to 6400 in an attempt to see how well the camera performed at this sensitivity value. For this image, I turned off in-camera noise reduction to set the camera up for a worst-case scenario. As you can see in the cropped image, the colors are still saturated while still maintaining usable detail in the tulips. I’m exceedingly impressed with the camera at ISO 6400. Click here to download a full resolution ISO 6400 image to your computer.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, ISO 6400.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, ISO 6400.

100% crop of image at ISO 6400.

100% crop of image at ISO 6400.

As the next series of images below show, I cranked up the ISO to 12,800 and 25,600 to see how the D800 would perform at its highest ISO settings. Obviously, the image quality breaks down rapidly, but these files are imminently useable with some noise reduction in post processing. I wouldn’t be afraid to use these ISO values if I had to get photos in near darkness.

Click here to download the high resolution ISO 12,800 image.

Click here to download the high resolution ISO 25,600 image.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 12,800.

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 12,800.

100% crop Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 12,800

100% crop Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 12,800

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 25,600

Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 25,600

100% crop Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 25,600

100% crop Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, F/16, ISO 25,600

My next tests were to take the camera outdoors to see how it would do in the bright sunlight. One of my goals was to see how the camera would perform in a very high contrast situation on white cherry blossom flowers. I also wanted to see how well images might look after significant cropping. You can see the uncropped and cropped version directly below. The D800 does a great job of holding detail on the flower petals while also preserving detail in the shadows. With the D800’s 36 megapixel files, I was able to crop the image fairly tightly and still come away with a photo I could easily print at 8″x10″ or larger. Verdict? I’m impressed.

Cherry blossom in direct sun. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f5.6, ISO 100.

Cherry blossom in direct sun. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f5.6, ISO 100.

Here's a cropped version of the same cherry blossom photo. Cherry blossom in direct sun. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f5.6, ISO 100.

Here's a cropped version of the same cherry blossom photo. Cherry blossom in direct sun. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f5.6, ISO 100.

The next test was to work with my red barn to see how the camera would do with shadow and highlight detail on a physical building. The first image here was taken with no changes to the file. In other words, you see exactly what the camera recorded. The second image I added a bit of shadow/highlight recovery in Nikon Capture NX2. Again, the D800 does a wonderful job of preserving information in both the highlights and shadows.

Red barn in high contrast lighting. No post-processing. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/18, 1/50s, ISO 200.

Red barn in high contrast lighting. No post-processing. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/18, 1/50s, ISO 200.

Red barn in high contrast lighting with shadow/highlight fix in Capture NX2. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/18, 1/50s, ISO 200.

Red barn in high contrast lighting with shadow/highlight fix in Capture NX2. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/18, 1/50s, ISO 200.

My final shot of this initial is of some green leafs with morning dew. I could see some fine detail on the stems of the leaves and wanted to see how the D800 would render these small hairs. The first image here is the uncropped image and the second is a 100% crop. Looking at the cropped image, it is truly amazing to see how much information the D800 collects. We’ve entered a new world of photography with the Nikon D800 and I can’t wait to see what other fantastic images I’ll create with this camera. In fact, I can’t wait to do some black and white landscape work as well as some studio portraiture to really see what this camera has to offer.

Leaves and water drops. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, 1s, ISO 200.

Leaves and water drops. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, 1s, ISO 200.

100% crop of leaves and water drops. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, 1s, ISO 200.

100% crop of leaves and water drops. Nikon D800, Nikon 24-70mm f2.8, f/16, 1s, ISO 200.

One final note: DxOMark just published the results from the Nikon D800 and they gave it the the best rating for any camera they’ve ever tested. How’s that for image quality! Click this for a direct link the DxOMark stats. Quoting from DxOMark’s website:

Friday March 23 2012

The Nikon D4 spent only a few days in the top spot for DxOMark sensor results before being dethroned by the Nikon D800, which is a complete success in every sensor-related respect:

  • Overall score: 1st (95)
    With its 4-point lead, the Nikon D800 has become the new sensor of reference — and with an unmatched quality-to-price ratio to boot: among the 8 top cameras, it is by far the least expensive (with an announced price of less than 3000 $).
  • Studio: tied for 3rd (25.3 bits)
    These results are living up to our expectations. Certain people openly wondered if the D800’s results would be comparable to those for medium-format cameras, and this certainly doesn’t contradict this idea.
  • Landscape: 1st (14.4 EV)
    Here also we expected the D800 to do well, and once again we were not disappointed. (This really wasn’t a surprise, given the results for the Nikon D7000.)
  • Sport (Low-Light ISO): 3rd (2853)
    Despite its smaller pixels, the D800 comes up with the same score as the D4, whereas the D3x lost several precious points with respect to the D3s.





Thousands of Images, Now What? Shipping

Posted March 21st, 2012 by   |  Photography, Software, Technology  |  Permalink

Our brand new book Thousands of Images, Now What? is shipping. We’ve just received our preliminary copies of the book and will be sending out autographed copies to all of you who pre-ordered. The book looks great and I’m very happy with the final product. You can order autographed copies at our website for Out There Images Books. Or, you can order from Amazon at this link: Thousands of Images at Amazon.com.

Order your copy today of Thousands of Images, Now What? Painlessly Organize, Save, and Back Up Your Digital Photos.

Order your copy today of Thousands of Images, Now What? Painlessly Organize, Save, and Back Up Your Digital Photos.





Two Great Nikon Related Articles

Posted March 16th, 2012 by   |  Photography, Technology  |  Permalink

Here are two resources for you Nikon shooters out there wanting to learn more about the Nikon D4 and the D800/D800E.

The first is a BTS (behind the scenes) video put together by Corey Rich from his new short film “Why”. The video shows how he created the film as well as all kinds of gear details that us gear heads love! Lenses, computers, helicopters, cameras and tech.

HOW of WHY from Corey Rich on Vimeo.

The next is an article by Michael Reichmann of Luminous-Landscape.com about choosing between the Nikon D800 and the D800E. I continue to receive questions every day about the difference between the cameras and which camera to buy. Michael’s article addresses many of these questions. Here’s the link: Luminous Landscape D800/D800E Comparison

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February 2012 Newsletter Posted

Posted February 10th, 2012 by   |  Photography, Technology, Travel  |  Permalink
Greetings Photographers!
The February 2012 Out There Images newsletter is now posted at our website here:
http://www.outthereimages.com/12_02_newsletter.html
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Topics
– Thousands of Images, Now What?
– The Nikon Creative Lighting System – 2nd Edition
– Stuff I Like This Month
– January GOAL Assignment: Fill the Frame
– February GOAL Assignment: Purposeful Distortion
– Tether Tools Wallee iPad Mounting System
– Photo Techniques: Should I Take my Big Camera on Vacation?
– Product Review: Cardsharp Folding Pocketknife
– Workshop and Business Updates
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